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1856 – 1860

Links to years: 1856 1857 1858 1859 1860

1856

Elsworth 5th January   Church Choir Treat.

On Thursday evening last, the church singers and ringers, together with their friends, partook of an excellent supper provided for them in the National school-room, by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. After which the rev. gentleman made a short speech upon the subject of church music. The health of the Queen was then drank and the National Anthem sung. The health of the rector and his lady was then proposed, and after much singing several songs, duets, and glees, the party broke up much pleased with their entertainment.

Elsworth 5th January   School Presents.

On New Year’s Day, the children belonging to the National Day and Sunday schools, were summoned to appear in the school-room for the purpose of receiving small presents, such as nets, handkerchiefs, half-pence, etc., from the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. We trust the above will encourage the juveniles to persevere more in their various studies.

Elsworth 19th January   Distribution of coals.

During the past week, several tons of coal have been distributed amongst the poor of the above village, some of the largest families receiving as many as 6 cwts., and all the poor widows 2½ cwts. each, which must be to them a great comfort at this inclement season of the year. Great praise is due to the principal farmers and others, who came forward so liberally in aiding so good an object as the above. The money already on the list of subscribers amounts to the sum of £24. 9s. 6d.

Elsworth 9th February   Shrovetide rustic sports.

On Tuesday evening last, some of the old rustic sports were revived, such as foot-ball, running, etc., which took place in the grass close, according to a custom formerly very much practised in this village. All the new married men since last Shrovetide, amounting to ten, ran any single man they pleased, or forfeited half a gallon, which was done, to no small gratification of the beholders. At about eight o’clock the party began to disperse, the runners going to the Fox and Hounds public house, where the remainder of the evening was spent in harmony and conviviality.

Elsworth 16th February   Choir receive gift.

On Thursday evening se’nnight, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector of the above place, presented his choir with a purse, containing five pounds, as an acknowledgement for past services, hoping they will persevere in their important services.

Elsworth 15th March   Vestry meeting.

On Thursday afternoon last, a meeting was held in the rectory house, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in the chair, for the purpose of choosing a guardian and constables for the ensuing year, when Mr. William Cotterell was re-elected for the former and the following gentlemen selected as proper persons for the latter,
viz:
Mr. John Pain Smith, farmer,
Mr. Philip Papworth, miller,
Mr. William Prior, butcher.

Elsworth 29th March   Pedestrianism.

During the last few weeks, the juveniles in the above village have appeared to thirst after pedestrianism; and on Thursday evening se’nnight, a mile race was run between Stephen Witherowe, Jun., and Charles Roberts, for five shillings which was won by the former, who performed his task two or three seconds under six minutes. It is understood that two or three more races are to come off within a fortnight; and we have no doubt, should the weather permit, some good running will be witnessed.

Elsworth 5th April   Parish Officers elected.

On Friday afternoon se’nnight, a meeting was held in the Rectory-house, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in the chair, for the purpose of choosing parish officers for the ensuing year. The accounts of the past year having been examined and passed, it was resolved that Mr. William Cotterell and Mr. Stephen Witherow be churchwardens; Mr. John Browning and Mr. Henry Scott be overseers; Mr. James Parsons and Mr. George Kimpton be surveyors, and Mr. John Pain Smith constable. A collection was afterwards made in aid of Addenbrooke’s Hospital.

Elsworth 3rd   May Fire.

On Friday se’nnight, the people in the above quiet village were thrown into a state of consternation and alarm, owing to a man riding furiously through the town, shouting “fire”. Many of the inhabitants quickly followed him to the scene of conflagration, a farm situate about a mile and a half from Elsworth, in the occupation of Mr. Thomas D. Hensman, and known as the Rogue’s Lane Farm, in that parish. It appears his men were paring and burning a piece of old sward near the farm, when one of them was carrying some lighted straw from one fire to the other, the wind blowing strong at the same time from the S.W. carried some of the fire among the surrounding straw, when the whole of the buildings, consisting of two large barns, stable, granary, piggeries, and cart sheds, were consumed, together with a large wheat stack, part of a barley and hay stack, a quantity of straw, and a cottage, in which the foreman lived. In one of the barns was a quantity of beans not dressed, and in the other upwards of 40 qtrs. of wheat dressed, ready for market, a small portion of which was got out, through the exertions of the persons present. All the live stock were saved, as the fire happened in the middle of the day, otherwise they must have fallen prey to the devouring element, as in half-an-hour all was razed to the ground. There is no doubt that the fire was altogether accidental. The damage done must be very great, but we understand Mr. Hensman is insured.

Elsworth 10th May   Thanksgiving Day.

Sunday last being set apart by royal proclamation to be observed as a day of thanksgiving for the restoration of peace to Europe, two excellent discourses were delivered in the parish church by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. The one in the afternoon was from Joshua xxiii. 10, 11, and that in the evening from 2 Chron., xv, 2. A collection was made after each service in aid of the children and orphans of soldiers and sailors who have been engaged in the late war. The amount raised was £2.

Elsworth 10th   May Club Feast.

Tuesday last being the twenty-second anniversary of the George and Dragon Benefit Club feast, upwards of fifty members sat down to an excellent dinner, provided by host Witherow, in his usual good style; after which several speeches were made. The party afterwards proceeded to the bowling alley, where some good play came off. The members subsequently retired to the club room, and the evening was spent in the utmost harmony and concord.

Elsworth 7th June   Liberality.

On Wednesday last all the poor widows in the above village were regaled with plum cake and tea, provided for them at the Fox and Hounds inn, by the Lady of the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. The old dames, after partaking freely of their favourite beverage, departed to their respective homes, much pleased with their afternoon’s entertainment.

Elsworth 5th July   Confirmation.

On Tuesday morning last, a confirmation was held in Elsworth church, when upwards of 90 young persons received the sacred rite. The ceremony was performed by the Lord Bishop of Ely. After a short address from the bishop, the congregation dispersed, when his lordship took his departure for another confirmation at Caxton.

Elsworth 4th October   Church Missionary Society.

On Sunday afternoon next, a sermon will be preached in the parish church, by the Rev. E. H. Perowne, M.A., Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, after which a collection will be made in aid of the above society. Divine service to begin at half-past two o’clock.

Knapwell 4th October   Fire.

On Friday morning last week, about one o’clock, the inhabitants of the above quiet village were roused from their slumbers by a cry of fire. It appears that a woman was awoke by hearing one of her children cry, when she observed smoke and flames issuing from an old hovel which nearly joined her house. There being but little wind at the time, and plenty of help, the fire was quickly got under, doing no other damage than destroying the old building, which, we are sorry to say, contained some gleaning barley, potatoes, and several implements of husbandry, belonging to the poor men. Great praise is due to the labourers, as they worked well to stop the progress of the flames, which might have otherwise ended in the destruction of a great amount of property, as the stack-yard of Mr. Samuel Whitehead was not more than 200 yards off. The fire is believed to have arisen from some ashes being thrown into the hovel before they were extinguished.

Elsworth 11th October   Church Missionary Society.

On Sunday afternoon last, a powerful and impressive sermon was preached in the parish church by the Rev. E. H. Perowne, M.A., Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, from St. Matthew, 28th Chapter, 18, 19, 20th verse. A collection was afterwards made in aid of the above society, which amounted to £1. lls.4d.

1857

Elsworth 3rd January   Christmas Charity.

On Christmas day, all the poor widows in the above village received a good piece of mutton each for their Christmas dinner, from the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, which was followed by a piece more from one of the principal farmers. Several poor families have been supplied with flannel, etc., during the late inclement weather, and £3 was also given away in bread throughout the parish church on the above day, after a sermon preached by the Rector.

Elsworth 24th January   Choir Supper.

On Friday evening se’nnight, the members of the Church choir, amounting to upwards of thirty sat down to an excellent supper in the National School-room, provided by their worthy rector, the Rev. J. R. Dobson; after which several healths were drunk, especially that of her Majesty which was followed by singing the National Anthem. Several other songs and glees were performed by the choir up to a seasonable hour, when the party broke up, much pleased with their entertainment.

Knapwell 24th January   Sudden death.

An inquest was held before Mr. F. Barlow, coroner, at Knapwell, on the 22nd instant, on view of the body of Philip Saunders. The deceased was shepherd to Mr. Simon Francis, of Knapwell Grove, and slept at his master’s house in the same bedroom with John Chapman, one of his master’s horsekeepers. On Wednesday morning the horsekeeper arose, at twenty minutes before 5 o’clock and the deceased then asked him what time it was. The horsekeeper having dressed himself, was going across the yard to the stable, when the wind blew out his light, and he returned to the foot of the stairs leading to the bedroom in which he had left the deceased, and called to him to be informed where the matches were, and the deceased gave him this information. About half an hour afterwards, the other horsekeeper came to that yard, and called three times to the deceased to get up, but receiving no answer, he went and fed his horses, and then went up into the deceased’s room to wake him up, and found him dead in the bed. This was about 6 o’clock. Mr. Thomas George Brooks, of Caxton, made a post mortem examination, and found the heart and its valves considerably diseased; and the jury found that death was caused by diseases of the heart.

Elsworth 31st January   Church Choir.

On Thursday last, the members of the Church choir received from the hands of their rector a purse, containing five pounds, as an acknowledgement for past services, and as an encouragement for future diligence in so important a part of divine worship.

Elsworth 31st January   Distribution of coal.

Upwards of 20 tons of coal have been given away to the poor of the above parish, the widows receiving 2½ cwt. each, and some of the largest families as many as 5 cwt. Many thanks are returned to the farmers and others who came forward so liberally towards the subcription for the same, and also in sending their teams which conveyed the coals to their very doors.

Elsworth 7th February   Inquest on child.

An inquest was held at the Three Horse Shoes public-house, in this parish, on Thursday last, before Mr. F. Grain, deputy-coroner, on the body of Julia Throssell, a little girl about 5 years of age, who died on the previous Tuesday afternoon, after a very short illness, and without being attended by any medical man. It appeared by the evidence of the mother of the deceased that she had, from her infancy, been frequently ailing, and from the previous Friday she seemed to be suffering from cold. On the Tuesday morning she remained in bed, but appeared much the same until about half-past one o’clock when she asked for something to drink; and her mother on going to give it her, noticing a change in her appearance, sent for a nurse named Knibbs who lived near, but the child died in about half-an-hour afterwards, apparently from suffocation. Mr. Brook, surgeon, of Caxton, made a post mortem examination of the body, and stated that on opening the throat he found in the lower part of the trachea an abcess, apparently of long standing, formed by a tubercular deposit, and which, by pressing upon the air-tube, had, he had no doubt, caused the death of the child by suffocation. The jury returned a verdict of “died by the visitation of God.”

Elsworth 28th February   Farm fire.

On Monday morning last, about eleven o’clock, a farm in the occupation of Mr. James Parsons, was discovered to be on fire, by one of the men who was thrashing barley. Alarm was immediately given, and the inhabitants were quickly on the spot, and did all in their power to stop the progress of the flames, which they at last accomplished, but not until all the farm buildings, together with a quantity of barley undressed, twenty quarters of barley in sacks, nine pigs, and a number of fowls were consumed. Great fears were at one time entertained that the dwelling house of Mr. Stephen Witherow, known as the George and Dragon inn, would fall a prey to the devouring elements; but through the good management and exertion of those present, it was saved, although a stack of clover, hay, and two pig sties adjoining, with several other articles, were burned. There is no doubt but that it originated through the diabolical act of an incendiary.

Elsworth 14th March   Fishing extraordinary.

On Saturday last, March 7th, Mr. William Ducker, schoolmaster of the above place, took with one rod out of the New Staunch Pit, Over, eleven stone weight of fish – ten of bream and one of roach and perch. Of the former he caught two at once six times during the day, their united weight being forty two pounds. What appears the most surprising, is his tackle, it being so light, the line being one of Cherk’s finest Derby twist with fine gut, and a light fly rod. And to add to the difficulty, he had to land all the fish in a very strong current, there being two gates open at the time.

Elsworth 4th April   Parish Officers.

On Thursday afternoon, last week, a meeting of ratepayers was held in the Rectory-house, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in the chair, for the purpose of examining the parish books of the past year, which gave satisfaction, and were passed: and also for choosing parish officers for the ensuing year. The following gentlemen were selected, viz., Mr. William Cotterell, Guardian; Mr. James Parsons and Mr. William Hammond, Overseers; Mr. James Parsons and Mr. George Kimpton, Surveyors; Mr. John Pain Smith, Constable; and Mr. George Kimpton, Rate-Collector.

Elsworth 4th April   Pictorial Entertainment.

On Friday evening, March 27th, Mr. Sutton gave a grand pictorial entertainment in the National School room of the above place, of his gigantic and unrivalled new diorama of the late war and of the Holy Land. We are justified in saying that Mr. Sutton is worthy of public patronage, as decidedly his views are better than any which have hitherto made their appearance amongst us.

Elsworth 18th April   Sheep Worrying.

On Tuesday night last, a number of sheep, the property of Mr. Samuel Witherow and Mr. James Parsons, were worried in a shocking manner, so much so that six belonging to the former were found dead, and several others not likely to recover. Luckily none belonging to the latter were killed, though severely bitten. We are glad to say that two dogs were taken on Wednesday morning, having blood about their mouth, an emetic was given them, and a quantity of wool afterwards found among the contents of their stomachs, leaving no doubt that they were the perpetrators of the act.

Elsworth 18th April   Churchwardens elected.

On Thursday afternoon last, a meeting was held in the Rectory house, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in the chair, for the purpose of examining the Churchwardens’ account for the past year, which gave satisfaction, and were passed. Afterwards it was carried unanimously that Mr. William Cotterell be re elected as parish warden, and Mr. Stephen Witherow on the part of the Rector, for the year ensuing.

Elsworth 2nd May   Inquest.

Another inquest was held on Wednesday last, before F. Barlow, Esq., Coroner for the county, at Elsworth, on view of the body of Sarah Cotterell, aged 63 years. From the evidence of Mr. Ducker, it appeared that on Monday last he had been spending the evening with her son, and that she appeared then in perfect health and cheerful, till about 9 o’clock, when she was taken ill, and left the room to go into the kitchen, to which place he was almost immediately summoned by the servant, when he found her on the ground with her head doubled under her; and on raising her head it struck him that she was dying, and she almost immediately afterwards expired. Mr. Brooks, surgeon, of Caxton was examined at the inquest, and the jury, upon his testimony, found that the cause of death was hydro thorax.

Elsworth 27th June   Straw fire.

On Tuesday last about two o’clock in the afternoon, a fire was discovered on the premises of Mr. Henry Scott, draper. It appears that a quantity of straw and manure lying in the yard, ignited. Had it not been seen at the time it was it must ultimately have burned down a number of houses and a timber yard, which were in a continuous line. But there being plenty of assistance and a good supply of water, it was soon put down, doing but little damage.

Elsworth 27th June   Church Missionary Society.

On Sunday afternoon next, a sermon will be preached in the parish church by the Rev. J. Tucker, who has been for many years a missionary in Southern India, and who is now on a visit to this country for the benefit of his health. A collection will be made after the sermon in aid of the above society. Divine service at half-past two.

Elsworth 25th July   National School Treat.

On Friday afternoon last week, the children belonging to the National day and Sunday schools, with their teachers, amounting to upwards of 100, were regaled with plum cake and tea, on the lawn in front of the Rectory House, by the worthy rector, the Rev. J. R. Dobson; after which the national anthem was sung by the children, and then they pleased themselves with several games, such as cricket and the like until the shades of evening stopped their diversions. They were then called together, and a quantity of fruit given them, when they retired home much pleased with their treat.

Elsworth 26th September   Christianity Among the Jews.

On Sunday afternoon last, a sermon was preached in the parish church by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, on the subject of the late abundant harvest, from Matthew xii, part of 39 verse -”The harvest is the end of the world.” After the sermon a collection was made in aid of the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews, amounting to £1. 2s.

Elsworth l0th October   Day of Humiliation.

Wednesday last, being a day set apart by Royal Proclamation for humiliation and prayer, imploring the Divine assistance on our arms, for the restoration of tranquility in India, two full services were performed in the parish church, by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. The rev. gentlemen chose for his text, in the morning, 2 Chron. xxxii. 2526; and in the afternoon Luke xiii. 2, 3. A collection was made after each service, amounting to £3 16s. 1d.

Elsworth 31st October   Accident.

On Thursday evening se’nnight, as Mr. William Parsons, son of Mr. James Parsons, farmer of Elsworth, and Mr. James Kitchen, farmer, Bourn, were returning from a shooting excursion through Long Stow, the horse ran on one side of the road, when the vehicle and its occupants were precipitated into a large pond. The night being excessively dark, and raining hard at the same time, it was with some difficulty they were extricated from their perilous situation. Luckily no damage was done, otherwise than Mr. Parsons losing his gun and one boot, and both receiving a good ducking.

1858

Elsworth 2nd January   Christmas Charity.

We have great pleasure in stating that the poor widows in this village have not been forgotten by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, as each one received a piece of mutton for Christmas dinner. 30 stone of bread was also given away at the parish church on Christmas Day. Great praise is due to the farmers, as they one and all paid their labourers for the above day; and likewise to the publicans, as their houses were closed as on Sunday, and never do we remember witnessing a more sober and peacable Christmas.

Elsworth 30th January   Church Choir Supper.

On Friday evening se’nnight, the Church singers, with their friends, were invited to an excellent supper, provided for them in the national school-room, by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. Ample justice having been done to the good things, the blessing was pronounced by his reverence, and the cloth drawn. The Queen and Royal family were proposed, and responded to by the choir singing the National Anthem. After spending a merry and harmonious evening up to a seasonable hour, the party separated, well pleased with their entertainment.

Elsworth 13th February   Distribution of coal.

During the late cold weather, upwards of 23 tons of coal were given away to the poor of the above parish, all the widows receiving 3 cwts. each, and some of the largest families, as much as 6 cwts. Too much praise cannot be attributed to the Rector and his wealthier parishioners, for supplying their poorer neighbours with such an article at this season of the year.

Elsworth 20th March   Inquest.

An inquest was held on Saturday last, before F. Barlow, Esq., coroner, at Elsworth, on view of the body of Miss Mary Parsons, aged 47. The deceased had for some years been somewhat imbecile in mind, and her bodily health had not of late years been good, and she had been accustomed at times to keep her bed for days and even weeks together, without cause for so doing. On Friday the 12th inst., she appeared in better health than usual, and cheerful, and ate her meals heartily, but would not get up. Miss Lucy Brasher, her attendant, had left her bedroom for about ¾ of an hour, and returning to it about 4.30 found her speechless and evidently dying, and she died in about half-an-hour afterwards. Mr. Ellis, surgeon, of Willingham, was examined at the inquest, and without making any post mortem examination, stated he had no doubt the deceased died from paralysis caused by a softening of the brain.

Elsworth 20th March   Parish Meeting.

On Thursday last, a meeting was held in the rectory house, for the purpose of looking over the parish books, which gave great satisfaction, and also for electing the following parish officers for the ensuing year, viz., Mr. William Cotterell, guardian; Mr. John Kirby and Mr. George Kimpton, overseers; Mr. James Parsons and Mr. George Kimpton, surveyors.

Elsworth l0th April   Churchwardens Election.

On Thursday afternoon last, a meeting was held in the Rectory-house, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in the chair, for the purpose of examining the Churchwardens’ accounts for the past year, and also for choosing Churchwardens for the year ensuing, when Mr. Wm. Cotterell and Mr. Stephen Witherow were re-elected.

Elsworth 1st May   Addenbrooke’s Sermon.

On Sunday afternoon last, a sermon was preached in the parish church by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in aid of the above valuable institution. The rev. gentleman chose for his text the l0th chapter of St. Luke, latter part of the 37th verse -”Then said Jesus unto him, Go and do thou likewise.” The collection amounted to £1. 6s. 6d.

Knapwell 12th June   Sunday Schools.

On Sunday last, sermons were preached in the parish church by the Rev. J. Campbell, officiating minister, in aid of the above schools. After an excellent and eloquent discourse from 4th chapter of Acts, part of 36th verse, “the son of consolation” the sum of £1. l0s. 5dwas collected.

Elsworth 14th August   Sale of Farm.

Sale of the Freehold and Copyhold Farm of the Late Mr. Baldock, of Elsworth – This property, situated at Elsworth and Hilton, was sold by auction by Messrs. Wentworth and Son, at the Unicorn Inn, St. Ives, on Monday last: there was a very large attendance and great competition. The property was arranged in fourteen lots, and produced upwards of eight thousand pounds; the Hilton pasture made one hundred guineas per acre.

Elsworth 28th August   Sheep worrying.

On Thursday evening se’nnight, several sheep were worried in fields belonging to Mr. James Parsons and Mr. Browning, of the above place. One, the property of the latter, was eaten, excepting the shoulders and head; and several, the property of the former, were severely bitten. Luckily two men were crossing the field at the time, otherwise the consequence no doubt would have been very serious, as it was with great difficulty the dogs could be made to loose their hold, and one was about to fly at the man who afterwards succeeded in capturing them.

Elsworth 4th September   Melancholy and Fatal Accident.

On Friday, the 27th ult., an inquest was held in this place, before F. Barlow, Esq., coroner, on view of the body of a little girl, six years old, named Emily Witherow. The father of the deceased is a miller, and on Thursday she accompanied him in his cart to the mill: she played about the interior for a quarter of an hour, and at half-past three o’clock expressed a desire to go home: her father, who was engaged in conference with his foreman, desired her to go and get into the cart, which was in waiting, and she departed for that purpose. Mr. Witherow followed in a minute or two, and was horror-struck at finding her lying insensible in front of the mill, having been struck by one of the sails on the head. The deceased, who was surrounded by a pool of blood, was conveyed home, and medical aid called in, but all to no purpose: the brain was literally cut in two, and she died the same night. Verdict, “accidental death.”

Elsworth 18th September   School Treat.

On Friday afternoon se’nnight, the children belonging to the Church day and Sunday schools were regaled with tea, plum cake, etc., on the lawn in front of the Rectory House, by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. Ample justice having been done to the good things, the youngsters played at several games, such as cricket, swinging, etc., up to a reasonable hour, when they dispersed, much pleased with their treat.

Elsworth 16th October   Christianity among the Jews.

On Sunday afternoon next, a sermon will be preached in the parish church, by the Rev. F. T. Bassett, M.A., Secretary for the Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews; divine service to begin at half-past two. A collection will be made after the sermon in aid of the above society.

Elsworth 23rd October   Christianity among the Jews.

On Sunday afternoon last, an impressive sermon was preached in the parish church, by the Rev. F. Tilney Bassett, Secretary to the above society, from St. Matthew, 27th chap., 25th verse: “Then answered all the people and said, his blood be on us and on our children.” The sum of £2 2s. 4d. was collected after the service.

Elsworth 23rd October   Accident.

On Sunday morning last, an accident of a rather serious nature happened to a labouring man named William Harden. It appears he was crossing a field between the above place and Boxworth, and was stooping down to gather mushrooms, when he was attacked by a furious heifer, which butted him down and knelt upon him, by which means we understand two of his ribs were broken, and a severe wound on his head caused by its horns. Hopes are entertained of the poor fellow’s recovery, although he is very ill.

1859

Elsworth 1st January   Charity.

On the Friday preceding Christmas-day, all the poor widows had their usual allowance of mutton from the Rev. J. R. Dobson, Rector, 36 stones of bread were given away after a sermon at the parish church, on Christmas day; and we believe all the farmers either gave their men a substantial dinner, or paid them instead, so that they might with their families enjoy themselves on that holy day.

Elsworth 5th February   Distribution of Coals.

During the past four weeks upwards of twenty-two tons of coal have been given away to the poor of the above parish: all the widows receiving 3 cwt. each, and some of the largest families as many as 6 and 7 cwt. Many thanks are due to the Rector, Churchwardens, and farmers, in contributing so liberally in supplying their poorer neighbours with such a necessary article of consumption.

Elsworth 26th March  Vestry meeting.

On Thursday afternoon last, a vestry meeting was held in the Rectory house, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in the chair, for the purpose of choosing Overseers and Surveyors for the year ensuing. The late officer’s books were examined and passed and the following officers were elected: Mr. William Cotterell, guardian; Mr. Edward Lansbury and Mr. George Kimpton, overseers; Mr. James Parsons and Mr. George Kimpton, surveyors; and Mr. George Kimpton, rate collector.

Elsworth 23rd April   Accident.

On Wednesday last, an accident of rather a serious nature happened to a labouring man named Richard Hern. It appears he was drilling, and the horses being frightened at something ran away, when one of the wheels of the drill ran over his body and hip. The poor fellow was conveyed home, and Mr. Brook, surgeon, of Caxton, sent for, who, upon his arrival, found two of his ribs broken, and he was otherwise seriously injured. We hope, however, the poor man is, according to the latest account, likely to do well.

Knapwell 23rd April   Burglary.

On Sunday evening last, the Rectory-house was broken into during the temporary absence of the Rev. J. Campbell, and money to the amount of £5. l0s. in gold and silver stolen therefrom. The thieves have not been detected, although the police are using every means to find them out.

Elsworth 7th May   Thanksgiving Sermon.

Sunday last, being a day of Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the success granted to our arms in restoring tranquillity in Her Majesty’s Indian dominions, a sermon was preached in the parish church, by the rector, the Rev. J. R. Dobson. The rev. gentleman chose for his text, Isaiah xxvi. 3: “Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on thee: because he trusteth in thee.” After an excellent discourse, a collection was made for the benefit of a special mission to India, and the Soldiers’ Daughters’ Home, amounting to £1. 4s. 6d.

Elsworth 18th June   Confirmation.

The Lord Bishop of the Diocese has notified his intention to administer the rite of Confirmation in our parish church, on the 7th day of July.

Elsworth 2nd July   Hay Stack Fire.

On Friday last week, smoke was seen issuing from a hay stack, in this village, the property of Mrs Gurson. It appeared that an old man, who was occasionally employed by Mrs Gurson, to go errands was sent to fetch some hay from the stack for the pony, and, according to his own statement, he lighted his pipe whilst there, with a lucifer match, which he threw down, thinking it was extinguished, but such not being the case, the stack immediately caught fire. Fortunately, there was but little wind at the time, otherwise, several small cottages, within ten yards of the stack, might have been burnt to the ground. We are glad to state that no harm at all was done, beyond the spoiling of the hay.

Elsworth 9th July   Confirmation.

On Thursday last the Lord Bishop of Ely held a Confirmation in the parish church, when upwards of 100 received the Apostolic rite from the above and neighbouring villages, viz., Gravely, High and Low Papworths, Conington, Knapwell, Boxworth and Lolworth. After a beautiful address from the Bishop, his Lordship left for another confirmation at Caxton.

Knapwell 9th July   Sunday School.

On Sunday afternoon, a sermon was preached in the parish church by the Rev. J. Campbell, officiating minister, in aid of the above schools. The Rev. gentleman chose for his text the 14th chapter of St. Luke, part of the 23rd Verse -”Go out into the highways and hedges and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled.” A collection was made after the sermon.

Elsworth 16th July   School Treat.

On Friday, the 8th inst, the children belonging to the Baptist Sunday School had their annual treat of tea, plum-cake, etc., in the schoolroom adjoining the chapel; after which the youngsters played at several innocent games, such as cricket, scrambling for nuts, and the like, until about nine o’clock when they were called together, and a short but earnest address delivered to them by their much respected pastor, Mr. S. Sargeant, when all went to their respective homes, much pleased with their afternoon’s entertainment.

Elsworth 23rd July   Choir supper.

On Friday evening the 15th. inst., the members of the church choir, with several others, partook of an excellent supper provided for them in the National school room, by the rector the Rev. J. R. Dobson, after which the health of her Majesty was proposed and responded to by singing the National Anthem. Several good songs having been sung by the choir, the rev. gentleman, after addressing them in a brief but earnest manner, took his leave. The rest of the evening was spent in harmony and good feeling one towards another.

Knapwell 8th October   Inquest.

An inquest was held by Mr. Barlow, at The Three Horse Shoes, Knapwell, on Saturday, 1st October, on the body of Joseph Fox. The deceased had worked for some time on an off-hand farm of the Rev. Mr. Campbell, and was about 56 years of age. He was a single man. For some time he had complained of a pain in the chest and shortness of breath, but had always kept at his work till Thursday, when he appeared worse, and on Friday morning he died in the barn where he slept, before medical aid could be procured. A post mortem examination was made by Mr. Brooks, surgeon, and it was found that he died of a diseased heart. Verdict accordingly.

Knapwell 12th November   Accident.

On Saturday last, an accident of a serious nature happened to a man named George Vurley, labourer of the above place. It appears that the farmers, as is customary, out of good will to their men, lent them teams to fetch their coals for the winter; and getting intoxicated, the poor man above named by some means broke his thigh. He was conveyed home, and Mr. Brook, surgeon, of Caxton, sent for, who set the limb. It is high time that men entrusted with their master’s property knew better; they need not wonder if all good old customs, as they term them, are broken off.

Elsworth l0th December   Evening school opened.

We have much pleasure in stating that the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector of this place has opened an evening school during the winter months, for all young men of sixteen years old and upwards, who like to avail themselves of the opportunity. We wish him success in his undertaking, for the instruction and welfare of his parishioners.

Elsworth 24th December   Christmas meat.

During the past week, three splendid oxen have been slaughtered by our worthy townsman, Mr. William Silk, butcher, two short-horns and one Hereford, weighing respectively 76, 78 and 60 stones.

Elsworth 24th December   Christmas Charity.

All the poor widows on Thursday last received their annual present, namely, a good piece of mutton each for their Christmas dinner, from the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. Steps were being taken towards purchasing coals for the poor and needy during the inclement weather.

1860

Elsworth 21st January   Church Choir Supper.

On Friday evening week, the members of the Church choir, with the ringers, partook of an excellent supper, consisting of the good old English fare of roast beef and plum-pudding, provided for them in the National school-room, by the rector, the Rev. J. R. Dobson. Ample justice having been done to the good things, the cloth was withdrawn, and the health of her Majesty proposed and responded to. The rev. gentleman then made some remarks upon the necessity of being more punctual at the practice meetings, giving the members to understand that it is by that, and that alone, they could arrive at perfection in that great and good art. The rest of the evening was spent in harmony and good feeling one towards another.

Elsworth 25th February   Storm damage.

On Sunday afternoon last, a storm of an unusual nature passed over the above village. The wind, which had been blowing strongly from the North West during the former part of the day, blew a perfect hurricane about three o’clock so much so that the buildings of a farm recently erected were divested of their tiling, and a barn moved several feet from the ground-sill by the violence of the wind, which was accompanied by snow and sleet. We hear of no other damage being done in the neighbourhood, excepting the stripping of stacks, and a few arms of trees being blown off.

Elsworth 3rd March   Distribution of coals.

During the late inclement weather, several tons of coals have been given away to the poor -the widows receiving 3 cwt. each, and some of the families as many as 6 cwt. -through the liberality of the principal farmers, landowners, and the rector.

Elsworth 3rd March   Wind damage.

During the strong wind on Tuesday last, the newly erected farm mentioned in our impression a fortnight ago shared as bad a fate as or even worse than before. The wind, which was general throughout the country, must have done a deal of damage, as our own village and neighbourhood will testify. About 12 o’clock it was truly terrific; the reed and straw from the stacks and buildings were scattering about in all directions. A wheat shed was, we understand, blown down at Conington, and several trees in that and the immediate vicinity.

Elsworth 31st March   Parish officers appointed.

On Thursday afternoon se’nnight, a meeting was held in the Rectory-house, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, Rector, in the chair, for the purpose of examining the officers’ accounts for the past year, which gave satisfaction; and also for choosing parish officers for the year ensuing, when the following persons were selected, viz.: Mr. William Cotterell, guardian; Mr. Philip Kirby and Mr. George Kimpton, overseers; Mr. James Parsons and Mr. George Kimpton, surveyors; and Mr. William Silk, constable.

Elsworth 21st April   Vestry Meeting.

A meeting was held in the Rectory-house, on the 12th of April, the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, in the chair, for the purpose of examining the churchwardens’ accounts for the past year, which gave satisfaction, and also for choosing fit and proper persons to fill the above important office for the year ensuing. It was proposed and carried unanimously, that Mr. William Cotterell be re-elected on the part of the parish, and Mr. Stephen Witherow was again called upon to fill the office of rector’s churchwarden.

Elsworth 14th July   Church Missionary Society.

On Sunday afternoon last, an impressive sermon was preached in the parish church, by the Rev. Wm. Young, L.L.D., rector of Croxton, from the 72nd psalm, part of the 15th verse: “Prayer also shall be made for him continually.” A collection was afterwards made, amounting to 11. 14s. 6d.

Elsworth 4th August   Church Choir Supper.

On Thursday evening, the 26th ult, the members of the Church choir, with several of their friends, partook of an excellent supper in the National school room, provided for them by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. The cloth being drawn, the health of her gracious Majesty the Queen was proposed, and responded to by the choir singing the National Anthem in good style. Several other songs were sung during the evening with good effect, especially two or three by W. Dobson, Esq., the eldest son of the rector. The rest of the time was spent in listening to some useful information from the Rev. gentleman respecting the assembling themselves together on such occasions as the above, to enjoy each other’s society, and to build each other up in so good an undertaking as the cultivation and practice of Church music.

Elsworth 4th August   Baptist School Treat.

On Thursday afternoon se’nnight, the children belonging to the Baptist Sunday school were regaled with plum cake and tea in the school-room adjoining the chapel. Ample justice having been done to the good things provided, the youngsters made their way into a green pasture, kindly lent by Mr. J. Parsons, where they pleased themselves and their teachers with several innocent games until the shades of evening put an end to their amusement.

Elsworth 25th August   Church Day and Sunday School Treat.

On Thursday afternoon se’ nnight, the children belonging to the above schools received their annual treat of plum-cake and tea, which was provided for them by the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector. The afternoon being wet, made it very unpleasant for the young people, as they could not go out of doors until between six and seven o’clock, when the weather cleared off, and they then enjoyed themselves on the lawn near the rectory, with innocent amusements, such as running races, jumping, etc., until it was dark; when the rector dismissed them, much pleased with their afternoon’s entertainment.

Elsworth 3rd November   Christianity among the Jews.

On Sunday afternoon last, a sermon was preached in the Parish Church, by the Rev. J. W. Burke, domestic chaplain to the Lady O. B. Sparrow, in the room of the Rev. Edward Geare, who was detained at home through illness. The Rev. gentleman, who is totally blind, chose for his text the 11th chapter of Romans, 28v.: “As concerning the Gospel, they are enemies for your sake; but as touching the election they are beloved for the Father’s sake.” After making an impressive discourse, a collection was made, amounting to £1 14s. 7d.

Elsworth 29th December   Christmas charity.

We have much pleasure in stating that all the poor widows and some of the largest families received a good piece of meat each from the Rev. J. R. Dobson, rector, for their Christmas dinner. Upwards of 25 st. of bread was given away, after a sermon at the parish Church, on the afternoon of Christmas day; and we have no doubt that the above was received with thankfulness, considering the inclement state of the weather, which we hope will induce some of the rich in the land to do likewise.